Department of Mathematical & Computing Sciences
Welcome to the St. John Fisher College Department of Mathematical and Computing Sciences Web Site
 

Course Descriptions


GMST Courses
AIT Courses

CSCI Courses| MATH Courses

CSCI 100 Level Courses | MATH 100 Level Courses
CSCI 200 Level Courses | MATH 200 Level Courses
CSCI 300 Level Courses | MATH 300 Level Courses
CSCI 400 Level Courses | MATH 400 Level Courses

Note: All prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher.


Current Course Offerings: Fall 2012


Course Descriptions (AIT)

APIT 200-Web Technologies (3)

This course provides a fundamental understanding of web technologies and their uses in establishing an effective web presence in profit or nonprofit organizations. Topics include: fundamental processes relative to the virtual transfer of information; business intelligence and data warehousing; web systems analysis and design (rudimentary data flow and "requirements" analysis); web system integration. Basic understanding of various technologies and architectural concepts include: XHTML, JavaScript; XML, ASP, browsers, and server architecture such as client-server and multitier design.

Prerequisite: CSCI 152 and CSCI 170, each with a grade of "C" or higher.

APIT 309-Professional Development I (3)

The goal of this course is two-fold: (1) prepare the student for the professional world of information technology, and (2) provide a platform for the initiation and continued development of a showcase of expertise in the application of informtion technology to the chosen second discipline. Included in this dual goal is: development of an e-portfolio, information technology career path exploration (current and future), evaluation and applications of current technologies, explorations of new and emerging technology, information technology usability studies, industry case study round-table discussions, development of an online internship profile, and individual and group presentations.

Restriction: Junior AIT majors
Prerequisites: CSCI 152, 155, 170, with grades of "C" or higher.

APIT 369-Web Design (3)

Students learn how to design and develop sites for the World Wide Web using Macromedia DreamweaverTM. The course covers graphic design, usability, and interface design. Technologies taught in the multimedia MacintoshTM computer lab include HTML, Macromedia FlashTM, cascading style sheets, and digital imaging using Adobe PhotoshopTM. Students complete individual projects and one group project. Cross-listed with COMM 369.

Note: Computer Science majors cannot take this course for a major elective.
Recommended prerequisite: Familiarity with computer graphics software.
Restriction: Junior or senior status only.

APIT 401 Organizing IT - Global Age (3)

This course presents a special topic in information technology that would not regularly be offered. Permission of the instructor is required to register.

Prerequisite: CSCI 152 with a grade of "C" or higher. CSCI-155 with a grade of "C" or higher.

APIT 480-Senior Project (3)

This course involves the application of formal design, development, usability, and architecture technique to the inception and installation of a large industry-based information technology project. Each student produces a non-trivial functional system, discusses the project and implementation options with a client, and presents their accomplishments and progress, as well as documents the product and its development process throughout the semester.

Restrictions: Senior AIT majors only.

APIT 490-Internship (3)

The student accepted into this course spends 10 to 15 hours per week as an intern with an organization in the Rochester area. The student performs tasks assigned by the supervisor in the organization with the goal of participating meaningfully in real-world computer applications or research.

Prerequisite: At least one other upper-level CSCI course and permission of the Internship Director for AIT.

Restrictions: Junior/Senior standing in AIT, minimum 3.0 GPA.

APIT 496-Independent Study (1-3)

Well-qualified seniors may initiate and carry out a proposal for independent, advanced work under the supervision of a member of the department.

Prerequisite: CSCI 152 with a grade of "D-" or higher. CSCI-155 with a grade of "D-" or higher.

Restrictions: Junior/Senior standing in AIT.




GMST Courses
AIT Courses

CSCI Courses| MATH Courses

CSCI 100 Level Courses | MATH 100 Level Courses
CSCI 200 Level Courses | MATH 200 Level Courses
CSCI 300 Level Courses | MATH 300 Level Courses
CSCI 400 Level Courses | MATH 400 Level Courses

Course Descriptions (CSCI)

CSCI-130 Cyber Law (3)

Legal regulation inside the Internet appears to require a different approach than the physical world, since most of traditional entities like boundaries and property do not apply in the same way. In addition, simple assumptions do not hold anymore. In the virtual world, a person (at least his or her online presence) can actually be in multiple places at the same time. The Internet has only recently become a place where everyone has some type of online presence (if only an e-mail account) and a forum to gather and exchange data and information. As such, many legal questions are still unanswered. The class will provide an overview of legal issues that arise within the use of networked computing services, among them: virtual jurisdiction, freedom of speech on the Internet, virtual search and seizure and trespassing, copyright and hacking/cracking and the rights and responsibilities of software developers and users. The class encompasses the study of regulations and case law, as well as an introduction to the workings of computing equipment.

CSCI 140C-Computer and Ethics (P2) (3)

This course covers a wide variety of issues of ethics in the area of computers in society. Among these are intellectual property, software theft, software reliability, hacking, information quality and the web, data privacy, military use of computers, artificial intelligence, the intelligence of computers, codes of ethics and computing, the use and misuse of creativity, database security, and the cost of not doing a job right.

CSCI 150-Introduction to High Technology (P4) (3)

With the rapid advance in Internet and PC-based software and hardware, technologies have undergone tremendous changes over the past few years. Students are introduced to a variety of computer-based technological skills being used in businesses. Among these are PC WindowsTM applications (graphical with PowerPointTM, spreadsheets with ExcelTM), web page authoring, virtual enhancement and presentation tools (such as graphic editors and presentation streaming software), and audio/video capture and delivery devices. Formerly offered as Computer Applications.

CSCI 152-Introduction to Programming with Visual BASIC (P4) (3)

This course uses Visual BASIC to introduce the beginning programmer to problem solving in a computer language. Topics covered are: events, I/O, numbers, strings, use of functions and procedures, relational and logical operators, IF statements, repetition (DO loops, FOR NEXT loops), arrays, sequential files, and Visual BASIC controls.

CSCI 155-Foundations of IT (3)

What is IT? Within this course, the various areas that comprise IT are explored. The course begins with an exploration of the history of IT from the first computer to the Internet. By learning about the past history of IT, students are able to use the past to "think about the future." Students then learn about the wide variety of subject areas and ways in which IT is applied. The course also assesses how IT affects the world and society as a whole from both a societal and ethical context.

CSCI 161-Foundations of Computer Science I (P4) (3)

This course is an introduction to the problem-solving and programming methodologies that are fundamental to the study of computer science. Problem solving follows both procedural and introductory object-oriented paradigms. An appropriate programming language is used to support these paradigms and facilitates an introduction to the concept of classes and objects. Students gain considerable experience with fundamental language constructs and types (classes), such as expressions, decisions, iteration, functions, structures, and strings. User-defined classes are introduced as a part of the problem-solving approach. The course includes a two-hour formal, scheduled laboratory. The course includes an introduction to LinuxTM/UNIXTM.

CSCI 162-Foundations of Computer Science II (3)

In this course, there is a further emphasis on object-oriented design and data abstraction as problem-solving strategies. A major part of the course is an introduction to fundamental data structures such as linked lists, stacks, and queues. These structures are implemented in an appropriate object-oriented language. The pointer concept is used, and recursion is used as a fundamental problem-solving tool. The course includes a two-hour formal, scheduled laboratory. The course is conducted in a UNIXTM environment.

Prerequisites: CSCI 161, MATH 150C, each with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 170-Internet Resources (P4) (3)

This course examines the history and overall structure of the Internet. Topics include: current scope and future direction of the Internet; resources and tools used in the methodical approach to gathering virtual information; virtual trends relative to tools used in compiling information gathered from the Internet and the use of those tools. Basic understanding of HTML and CSS technologies.

Prerequisites: CSCI 150 or CSCI 155, each with a grade of “C” or higher

CSCI Courses | MATH Courses | GMST courses | AIT Courses

CSCI 220-Multimedia Technologies (P4) (3)

This course is an overview of multimedia technology application in profit and nonprofit organizations, and multimedia authoring. Topics include: the principles of current trends in multimedia; application; implication of multimedia hardware and software as it relates to convergence; current and new multimedia technologies to create applications. Basic understanding of various technologies and concepts include: podcasting, low-bandwidth movie authoring, video as a means for virtual publishing.

Prerequisite: CSCI 150 or 155 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 231-Data Structures and Algorithms (3)

This course covers a variety of algorithms and their analyses, using some of the mathematical tools. Complex linked strutures such as B-trees, tries, graphs, hashing, searching, and sorting are implemented and analyzed.

Prerequisite: CSCI 162 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 241-Computer Architecture (3)

This course deals with the following topics: discussion of computer organization, registers, addressing, use of stacks, relo-catability, subroutines, macros, the assembly process, linking, loading. This course also gives an understanding of how computers are organized, including performance issues, processor design, pipelining, memory hierarchies, peripheral inter-facing, and multiprocessing. This course is focused on a RISC-based architecture, using a RISC-based language.

Prerequisites: CSCI 162 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 251-Introduction to Computer Security (3)

In this course, students learn the fundamentals of computer security. Topics to be covered include: authentication, cryptog-raphy, steganography, methods of digital eavesdropping, wireless security, access control, exploits, denial of service at-tacks, social engineering, intrusion detection and prevention, social engineering and security policies.

Prerequisites: CSCI 161 or CSCI 152, each with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 260-Introduction to Databases and Applications (3)

This course presents an overview of database organization and management. Topics include database organization, query-ing techniques, data extraction and manipulation, and application development and design. Students work with databases in multiple environments, including PCs, networks, and the WWW, and design and develop a database application using Microsoft AccessTM

Prerequisite: CSCI 150 or 155, each with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 290-Theory of Computation (3)

An elementary treatment of abstract computer modeling, including such topics as finite automata, languages, regular expressions, context-free grammars, and Turing machines. Formerly offered as CSCI 440.

Prerequisite: MATH 200C with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI Courses | MATH Courses | GMST courses | AIT Courses

CSCI 300-Networking (3)

This course provides a fundamental understanding of networks as communication systems. Emphasis is placed on computer networks and how computer networks and distributed computing are used to solve customer problems. Throughout the course, students explore the telecommunications and networking industry, as well as the basic concepts inherent to the application of data communications and computer networks in a digital age.

Prerequisites: MATH 150C and CSCI 155, each with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 303-C Module (1)

This course is a rapid but thorough study of the syntax of C. Aimed at the computer science major, this course provides the experienced programmer with a working knowledge of this popular high-level language, widely used in systems programming.

Prerequisite: CSCI 162 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 304-Visual BASIC Module (1)

This course is a rapid but thorough study of the syntax and features of Visual BASIC from an advanced standpoint. Aimed at the computer science major, this course provides the experienced programmer with a working knowledge of this important high-level language.

Prerequisite: CSCI 162 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 306-C++ Module I (1)

This course is a rapid but thorough study of the syntax and features of C++. Aimed at the computer science major, this course provides the experienced programmer with a working knowledge of this important high-level language.

Prerequisite: CSCI 162 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 310-Advanced C and System Programming (3)

This course covers topics in the C programming language beyond those covered in an elementary course. Among the topics covered are: the preprocessor, pointers, command line arguments, and unions. The interface of C to the operating system is seen in the discussion of system calls, process creation, exec, fork, and pipes, among others. Some of the C libraries are covered.

Prerequisite: CSCI 303 with a grade of "C" or higher, or a course in C programming language.

CSCI 313-UNIX Shell Programming (3)

Operating systems such as UNIXTM have a command line interpreter called a shell, which acts as an interface between the user and the operating system. Effective use of this interface requires knowledge both of the utilities available and the syntax and semantics of the shell. In this course, both the C shell and the Bourne shell families are examined. Useful utilities such as awk and sed are also discussed.

Prerequisite: CSCI 162 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 342-Operating Systems (3)

This course explores operating systems concepts and concurrent programming using JavaTM. Discussed are multithreaded programming, synchronization, classic synchronization problems and their solutions, and distributed programming. Operating systems concepts and concurrent programming using Java™ are also explored. Discussed are multithreaded programming, synchronization, classic synchronization problems and their solutions, and distributed programming.

Prerequisites: CSCI 231 and 241, each with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 351-Secure Software Development (3) Students learn advanced techniques in secure software development. This course covers classification of secure software development within different techniques for protecting software from exploitation. The material focuses on a set of software problems, including overflows, access control, rate conditions and input validation, and examines the reasons for their introduction with respect to the software development process, as well as techniques and methods that can be used to avoid the introduction of such security problems.

Prerequisites: CSCI 231, 251, and 303 each with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 353-Database Structures (3)

This course focuses on the internal, conceptual, and external views of modern database structures. The relational model is studied with specific attention to the theory and application of various query languages including Oracle TM SQL, QBE, and IngresTM. Additional topics include: data integrity, relational algebra, relational calculus, object-oriented databases, security issues, and concurrency issues.

Prerequisite: CSCI 231 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 365-Computer Graphics (3)

This course is an introduction to graphics hardware and software. Topics include vector and raster graphics, viewing and window coordinates, segmenting, 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional transformations, clipping, hidden surface algorithms, and graphics packages and systems. Students do extensive programming in developing a graphics package.

Prerequisite: CSCI 231 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 375-Programming the World Wide Web (3)

This course focuses on the WWW and the various languages and technologies used to provide interactivity and dynamic content to web pages. Markup languages (HTML, XHTML, XML) and scripting languages (JavaScriptTM, PHPTM PerlTM) are studied. Additional topics include: client/server databases, multimedia (FlashTM), browser and web server technologies. Students build and maintain a web site and complete several programming projects using available technologies.

Prerequisites: CSCI 162 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 395-Artificial Intelligence (3)

Fundamental concepts used in computer implementation of processes which imitate human cognition are studied. Topics include knowledge representation, logical deduction and problem solving, natural language understanding, knowledge bases, and expert systems. Students complete several programming projects.

Prerequisite: CSCI 231 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI Courses | MATH Courses | GMST courses | AIT Courses

CSCI 400-Special Topics (3)

This course presents a special topic in Computer Science that would not regularly be offered, such as Compiler Construction. May only be taken once.

Restrictions: Junior and Senior computer science majors.

CSCI 451 Applied Security Techniques (3)

Students learn advanced concepts of computer attacks and defenses in an intensive, hands-on setting. Students learn the details of various exploits, including buffer overruns and forma string attacks. Other specific attack techniques, such as Man-In-The-Middle, Denial of Services, Worms, Viruses, and Trojan Horses, are examined. Students then learn to craft defenses to these attacks from both a host-based and network-based point of view.

Prerequisites: CSCI 231, 251, and 303, each with grades of "C" or higher.

CSCI 452-Database Applications (3)

Relational database design and implementation are studied within the context of the Oracle database management system. Students design and implement a menu-driven application using Oracle and PL/SQL. Topics include: database and application design principles including data normalization, data integrity, entity-attribute-relationship methodology, UML, and human-computer interactions.

Prerequisites: CSCI 353 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 461-Programming Language Concepts (3)

This course is a study of the general principles of programming language design and implementation. Central concepts of syntax, semantic structures and run-time representations are discussed. Several programming languages are studied to compare and contrast their design, rather than to master one particular language.

Prerequisites: CSCI 231, and 290 each with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 470-Computer Networks and Internets (3)

This course discusses the basic concepts and technologies of data communications, computer networks, and the Internet. Data transmission techniques, communication codes and protocols, and data communication hardware are discussed. Networking topics include: topologies in LANs and WANs, interconnection hardware, addressing and routing techniques, and wireless networks protocols. Several Internet protocols and applications are studied including: TCP/IP, ICMP, ARP, TELNET, HTTP, FTP, SMTP and MIME.

Prerequisites: CSCI 241 with a grade of "C" or higher.

CSCI 475 Software Engineering (3)

This course covers topics in the development of software systems, including software life models, requirements definition, design, verification and validation and project management techniques. Each student then applies this knowledge in an individual software design project.

Restriction: Senior CSCI majors only.

CSCI 480-Senior Project (3)

This course involves the application of formal design technique to the development of a large software project performed by students working in teams. Each team produces a non-trivial software system, discusses the project and implementation options with a client, presents their accomplishments and progress, and documents the product and its development process throughout the semester.

Restrictions: Senior CSCI majors only.

CSCI 490-Internship (3)

The student accepted into this course spends 10 to 15 hours per week as an intern with an organization in the Rochester area. The student performs tasks assigned by the supervisor in the organization with the goal of participating meaningfully in real-world computer applications or research.

Prerequisite: At least one other upper-level CSCI course and permission of the Internship Director for CSCI.

Restrictions: Junior/Senior standing in AIT or CSCI, minimum 3.0 GPA.

CSCI 496-Independent Study (1-3)

Well-qualified seniors may initiate and carry out a proposal for independent, advanced work under the supervision of a member of the department.

Restrictions: Senior CSCI majors only.

 

GMST Courses
AIT Courses

CSCI Courses| MATH Courses

CSCI 100 Level Courses | MATH 100 Level Courses
CSCI 200 Level Courses | MATH 200 Level Courses
CSCI 300 Level Courses | MATH 300 Level Courses
CSCI 400 Level Courses | MATH 400 Level Courses

Course Descriptions (GMST)

GMST 501-Problem-Based Learning (3)

The course will enable teachers to develop an understanding of the theory and practice of problem-based learning (PBL) and its components. PBL is an apprenticeship in real-world problem-solving, which starts students with meeting an actual ill-structured problem with many different solutions. Participants will uncover specific PBL components and techniques needed to design and produce both group and classroom units. The classroom PBL unit will be implemented and evaluated within the teacher's classroom. The PBL approach offers 1-12 teachers a method of helping their students build thinking and problem-solving skills as they master important knowledge growing from issues or problems carefully linked to educational standards. PBL is both a curriculum organizer and instructional strategy that can be implemented wherever learning goals demand deeper understanding and learner ownership.

GMST 502-Inquiry in the Classroom (3)

Inquiry is at the heart of the Mathematics, Science, and Technology (MST) initiative. It is an effective, highly motivating means of learning. This course is designed to provide the opportunity for teachers to explore the various aspects of inquiry and to develop a level of comfort with and commitment to this method as they incorporate inquiry into their instructional repertoire. The class participants will experience inquiry lessons from the perspective of a student and will analyze these lessons from the perspective of the teacher. Inquiry lessons from the life sciences, earth science, physical sciences, mathematics, and technology will be modeled. Inquiry in the context of science, technology, and society (STS) education will be an important aspect of this course. As candidates become familiar with the skills necessary to conduct an inquiry-based classroom, they will be challenged to facilitate inquiry lessons of their choice, utilizing the skills and strategies modeled by the instructor.

GMST 510-Classroom Dynamics (3)

Many exciting, challenging movements are changing the way our classrooms look and operate. If our own learning experience has been traditionally structured in an individualistic, competitive manner, how are we to organize our classes to actively engage our students? The purpose of this course is to provide methods of structure, support, and organization for teachers as they incorporate student-centered pedagogical strategies into their teaching repertoire. Candidates will construct strategies for teaching and assessment that will complement their instructional program. Topics include learning styles, diversity in the classroom, cooperative learning, inclusion in the 7-12 classroom, group projects in mathematics/science/technology, classroom behavior, and classroom climate. Students will also explore the law as it relates to schools, including those relevant to students with special needs.

Co-requisite: GAED 534

GMST 511-Integrating Technology in a Learning Environment (3)

Traditional models of instruction are being challenged by recent developments in technology. The course will introduce candidates to the essential skills needed for new technologies in education. It will provide a coherent approach to issues surrounding technology and education besides just purchasing equipment and learning how to use it. Candidates will learn how to select and use computer applications in the classroom to produce multimedia presentations and instructional materials. They will also learn to evaluate such instructional products as interactive multimedia software, computer-based instruction software, student electronic portfolios, interactive videodisks, and simulation software. Candidates will be able to integrate the classroom application of computers and communications technologies. They will investigate various teaching trends, learning theory, and current teaching/learning research related to educational technology, multimedia production, presentation software, digital photography, interactive laser discs, web research, and web page design. Telecommunications technology including video conferencing, distance learning, simulation software and virtual reality devices, CD-ROMS, and virtual lessons will be investigated.

GMST 512-Engineering Design Solutions to Problems I (3)

This course addresses the essential components in design engineering and solutions to technical problems. Elements that engineers utilize in the field are brought into the classroom with the application of mathematics, science, and technology. Candidates apply technology, science, mathematics, and problem-solving to the engineering method and design in the development of engineering activities that are utilized in the classroom. Candidates are given a general theme and are asked to develop a product or device that addresses a real, unmet need in the marketplace. Major activities include, but are not limited to, the following: Ethics, Societal Impacts of Engineering, Optimization and Material Testing, Human Factors Engineering, Modeling, Design, Systems, and Problem-Solving.

GMST 513-Assessment Practices in Mathematics, Science, and Technology (3)

This course provides a study of assessment in mathematics, science, and technology and relates assessment to the MST Learning Standards. Other major course elements include: characteristics to be considered when evaluating assessment tools, as well as evaluation of existing assessment tools according to these characteristics; assessment methods; basic statistical concepts of educational measurement; brief history of assessment; vocabulary of assessment; assessment as an aid in the decision-making process; and accommodating individuals with disabilities in the assessment process. Development, implementation, and evaluation of assessment tools in the candidate's 1-12 classrooms will be a major focus. Opportunities will be provided for the candidate to work within the educational community to assist with assessment related to the MST Learning Standards.

GMST 517-Teaching Mathematics and Science (3)

The major focus of all the courses in the GMST program required for adolescence teacher certification in mathematics and science is the intertwining of content and pedagogy. This course, in particular, is designed to immerse the prospective teachers in a learning environment that examines curriculum, instruction, and assessment issues as related to New York State as well as NCTM, AAAS, and NSTA learning standards. Candidates gain experience in implementation of research-based instructional teaching strategies. The candidates will study educational planning and the development of instructional programs in a variety of classroom settings. Behavioral organization and management techniques for educational contexts will be a focal point and will include classroom climate, applied behavior analysis, scheduling, evaluation, interactive instructional strategies for cognitive change, as well as researching and differentiating instruction for students with special needs both due to learning styles and disabilities. The candidates also will have field experiences with practitioners who exemplify the implementation of state and national learning standards in mathematics and science. Designed for graduate candidates pursuing initial certification in mathematics or science.

Co-requisite: GAED 533

GMST 522-Differentiation of Instruction in the Mathematics, Science, and Technology Classrooms (3)

Focuses on differentiating instruction and is designed to prepare teachers to meet the needs of students in today's diverse classrooms, which consist of various races, cultures, strengths, talents, and readiness levels. Topics include flexible grouping, characteristics of and strategies for managing differentiated classrooms, pre- and post-assessment, and how to create a learning environment that will allow for differentiated instruction. Candidates will practice differentiating content, process, and product relative to mathematics, science, and technology.

GMST 525-Literacy Through MST Adolescence (3)

The focus of this course is to immerse teachers in the process of developing reading skills through MST activities. Because of the domain of the subjects of Mathematics, Science, and Technology, there is technical vocabulary needed for understanding the content. Strategic ways of instruction, vocabulary skills, and conceptual awareness will be a focus. Candidates will learn to recognize and analyze words, as well as understand the design of activities for self-development and self-awareness through reading and communication. Study skills, word analysis skills of how words and ideas are comprehended-influencing evaluation and appreciation-will be developed. Integrated project work in Language Arts will be designed and presented in the MST context.

GMST 530-Learning and Teaching Mathematics Through Explorations (3)

This course, designed for elementary and middle school teachers, focuses on developing a rich understanding of fundamental mathematical ideas by using explorations. The mathematical topics include: number sense, variable sense, measurement, patterns and functions, uncertainty, modeling, spatial relationships/geometric topics, algebraic topics, data collection, and analysis. The conceptual threads that unify the topics are: estimation, problem-solving, technology, communications, connections, and reasoning/logic. Candidates will explore real-life applications through graphical, numerical, and symbolic representations. They will design and present an inquiry-based activity.

GMST 531-Developing Literacy and Communication Skills Through MST Childhood (3)

The focus of this course is to immerse teachers in the process of developing reading skills through MST activities. Because of the domain of the subjects of Mathematics, Science, and Technology, there is technical vocabulary needed for understanding the content. Strategic ways of instruction, vocabulary skills, and conceptual awareness will be a focus. Candidates will learn to recognize and analyze words, as well as understand the design of activities for self-development and self-awareness through reading and communication. Study skills, word analysis skills of how words and ideas are comprehended-influencing evaluation and appreciation-will be developed. Hands-on learning methods will be experienced to show how to acquire the teaching-learning process. Integrated project work in Language Arts will be designed and presented in MST context.

GMST 532-Learning and Teaching Science Through Explorations (3)

This course, designed for elementary and middle school teachers, focuses on developing skills and concepts for synthesizing new information with the student's existing scientific knowledge through experimentation. Research topics include motion, matter, movement, structure, and environment. Candidates learn content, pedagogical knowledge, and risk-taking while implementing new ideas. Problem-solving tools developed include formulating hypotheses, collecting facts through observations, testing hypotheses through experimentation, and analyzing results. This course will develop cooperative perseverance, challenge, and appreciation of carrying out scientific explorations and therefore enabling students to apply scientific concepts.

GMST 533-Integrating Mathematics, Science, and Technology (3)

This course, designed for elementary and middle school teachers, involves locating and creating integrated mathematics, science, and technology activity modules suitable for inclusion at this level. Candidates will evaluate these modules according to peer evaluation criteria. Implementation of modules and assessment of learning will be studied. Topics also include: classroom dynamics, integrated curriculum issues, analysis of specific process skills of learning mathematics, science, and technology used in the modules, and problem-solving strategies.

GMST 535*-Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in Mathematics, Science, and Technology (3) This course is a thorough and comprehensive study of national and state curriculum and assessment standards in mathematics, science, and technology. Candidates will study standards for teaching mathematics and science. Additionally, the relative merits of various modes of instructional deliveries, including inquiry-based lessons, lectures, demonstrations, activities, projects, small-group work, and large-group work will be discussed and analyzed. Other instructional issues include effective use of time and establishing inquiry-based classroom discourse. Assessment issues include the purposes of assessment and methods of assessment. Candidates will be required to prepare a thematic mathematics, science, and technology unit of study.

*This course is not for GSMT majors.

GMST 541-AP Computer Science Using JAVA (3)

This course, designed for high school teachers, should give the experienced computer science teacher the necessary knowledge and background to teach an AP Computer Science A or AB course using the JAVA programming language. The candidate will achieve a level of mastery of the following topics: built-in types, operators, expression evaluations, control structures (if, if/else, switch, while, do/while, for), I/O, files, functions, use of constructs, pointers, objects and classes, templated functions and classes, exceptions and error handling, and the following required AP classes-string, vector, matrix, stack, and queue. Additional topics may be covered as time permits, as well as a discussion of suitable texts.

GMST 542-Discrete Algorithms and Concepts (3)

This course, designed for middle and high school teachers, takes an algorithmic approach to the study of abstract mathematical concepts. Mathematical study requires a high level of understanding of fundamental abstract ideas, such as those of sets, tuples, the prepositional calculus, relations, functions, mathematics induction, matrices, and linear spaces. Using the high-level mathematical programming language, ISETL, candidates will construct a mature and highly developed understanding. Using the ISETL computing language has been shown to be effective in aiding students to construct these concepts by writing short programs which become the concrete applications of the abstractions. In addition, ISETL will be used to implement the various algorithms that will be studied; its richness allows for representing functions in more than one way, which can help make the constructions that are necessary to view functions in a way similar to that in which mathematicians see them.

GMST 544-Experiments in Mathematics (3) This course, designed for middle and high school teachers, concerns the experimental method as a means of solving otherwise difficult mathematical problems. Experiments will be physical, pencil and paper, computer, and/or conceptual. Where analytical solutions are known, these will be discussed and the results compared with the experimental results.

GMST 545-Geometry: Theory, Applications, and Technology (3) This course is designed for middle and high school teachers. By introducing geometrical concepts through problem situations and hands-on activities, this course provides candidates with the opportunity to gain experience exploring, making conjectures, and formulating and solving geometrical problems, often by posing their own problems and making use of computer and graphing calculator technologies. Geometrical ideas will be presented from the Euclidean, non-algebraic, coordinate, transformational, and projective perspectives, thereby providing a blend of new and traditional subject matter. Among the topics that may be studied are axiomatic systems, including non-Euclidean geometry, transformations of the Euclidean plane, isometries, tessellations, tiling and patterns, and vector and matrix representations.

GMST 547-Mathematics in a Technological Age (3)

School mathematics, from algebra to calculus, is changing dramatically due to the infusion of current and emerging technology tools. These tools demand a new vision of school mathematics that shifts the emphasis away from symbolic manipulation toward conceptual understanding, symbol sense, and mathematical modeling. Through investigations, mathematics will be shown to be more than just a collection of techniques and algorithms for producing answers. Emphasis will be given to integrating the numerical, analytical, and geometric representations of problems and their solutions.

GMST 548-History of Mathematics (3)

This course studies the development of mathematical ideas from the prehistoric era to the present, with an emphasis on problem solving across a variety of cultures and eras, and in particular the mathematics of non-Western cultures. Candidates will research and present their findings on topics of their choice in each of the areas of biography, mathematics within a specific culture during a specific era, and the historical evolution of a single mathematical idea or construct across cultures.

GMST 550-Environmental Science (3)

Environmental science stresses biological concepts but includes the study of concepts from all of the sciences, as well as mathematics and technology. The goal of the course, designed for middle and high school teachers, is to provide candidates with an understanding of the relationships in the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Topics include the study of basic ecology through the construction, study, and manipulations of ecosystems; technological manipulations such as hydroponics plant growth and alternative energy sources; and analysis of the wide variety of environmental problems and opinions through current events. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on how the student may integrate environmental science into his or her own classrooms.

GMST 551-Integrated Science (3)

Integrated science is a coordinated look at all of the sciences, as well as mathematics and technology. The content of the course, designed for middle and high school teachers, will be built around unifying themes. The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between the sciences and allow the students, as teachers, to utilize the concepts of each of the sciences in their classrooms. Using an inquiry approach allows students on a team to analyze problems from various points of view: mathematically, scientifically, and technologically. By studying all of the sciences simultaneously, students will gain an understanding of the natural relationship between the physical setting and the living environment. Topics include the study of biology, chemistry, earth science and physics, as well as mathematics and technology. Candidates will be expected to solve problems using a variety of approaches. The use of unifying themes of the sciences in each candidate's classroom will be an emphasis throughout the course.

GMST 552-Science, Technology, and Society (3)

This course, designed for middle and high school teachers, will focus on how science, technology, and society are interrelated. Candidates will explore the general principles of science, the relationship of science and technology to their lives, and the application of scientific skills and technology to real-world problems. Topics involving biology, chemistry, physics, and technology will be explored, with an emphasis on the issues that are of greatest interest to students and/or of most significance to the local, national, or global community. Candidates will critically evaluate the impact of science and technology on society and the expectation society has of these disciplines. The candidate as teacher will focus on methods for exploring the interconnectedness of science, technology, and society in the classroom.

GMST 553-Experiments in Science (3)

The problems and experiments in this course, designed for middle and high school teachers, will demand the use of a variety of problem-solving methodologies including the scientific method, mathematical calculations, and engineering design. Candidates will work in labs designing and conducting experiments to strengthen their mathematical and scientific knowledge. The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between science, mathematics, and technology and to give each student, as a teacher, some experimental procedures he or she can use to integrate mathematics, science, and technology in his or her own classroom. Topics include: experimental design and execution, data analysis and interpretation, and reporting experiments, with an emphasis on defending results and conclusions. The use of multiple approaches in problem-solving will be emphasized throughout the course.

GMST 557-Special Topics in Science (3) This course presents an area of study in science not usually offered.

GMST 560-Three Areas of Technology: Physical, Information/Communication, Bio-related (3)

This course is designed to instruct and increase the knowledge base of K-12 Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education teachers in the development of MST curriculum units. Through a collaborative effort, candidates will design MST instructional units in each of the three areas of technology. Each unit is to include all plans including authentic assessment strategies to be used; material utilization; a specific grade-level application; a rationale for the unit; computer/Internet utilization; presented to the class in multimedia form; Bloom's Taxonomy; and affective, psycho-motor, and cognitive breakdown. Topics in the course are to include, but are not limited to, the following: analysis and implementation of the three areas of technology, historical perspective of technology education and technology to include human wants, needs and societal impacts; technology as a process; teaching creativity; MST instruction; school politics; facility design; and scheduling issues. Various assessment strategies will be modeled.

GMST 561-Engineering Design Solutions to Problems II (3)

A continuation of GMST 512 where the topics in GMST 512 will be studied in more detail and a background in technology education is required.

GMST 562-Human Factors Engineering (3)

Human factors, or ergonomics as it's often called, is the study of how people relate to things they use and to the usage environments. This course will cover two main areas of human factors: the design of products to make them easily usable and the design of workplaces to make them comfortable, productive, and safe. For each area, theories and principles will be discussed and reinforced by classroom exercises and practical examples that relate to everyday experiences. As a result of this course, the candidates, as teachers, will acquire knowledge and materials that are suitable for middle school and high school classrooms.

GMST 570-Modeling Change in Mathematics and Science (3)

In this course, candidates will develop the concepts and tools used in mathematical modeling. This includes skill with developing models, evaluating models, testing models, and redesigning the models. Throughout, the course will be project-based and will focus on using a variety of tools to inform our model building. The ideas of change, systems, variables, and parameters will be explored in a variety of problem-solving contexts. These models will be explored and evaluated by testing their solutions, typically with software such as Microsoft Excel, but prior knowledge of differential equations is not assumed. Possible course modules include predator-prey interaction, curve fitting, heat distribution in materials, fluid flow, queuing theory, and patient-drug interactions. Throughout the course, scientific concepts will play a major role in determining what is important to the model and in evaluating the usefulness of the model for predictions. Candidates should have a T1-83 graphing calculator or the equivalent.

GMST 577-Special Topics in Mathematics (3)

This course presents a special topic in Mathematics.

GMST 596-Independent Study (1-3) An opportunity to explore an area not regularly offered in the program.

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GMST 640-Research I: Research, Design, and Development and Capstone Experience (3)

The department expects that the research project will be a collaborative effort between the candidate, the community, and St. John Fisher College. Since the development of Teacher as Researcher is a major emphasis in this master's program, each core course will assist in this process. As part of GMST 640, seminars will be scheduled where progress on the research project will be presented and discussed as well as guidelines for the research project and final manuscript. The program director and/or the instructor will assist the student in the research process.

GMST 641-Research II: Presentation of Completed Research Project (3)

Research projects will be completed as well as the final manuscript. Seminars will be scheduled where presentation of the completed research will occur.

 

GMST Courses
AIT Courses

CSCI Courses| MATH Courses

CSCI 100 Level Courses | MATH 100 Level Courses
CSCI 200 Level Courses | MATH 200 Level Courses
CSCI 300 Level Courses | MATH 300 Level Courses
CSCI 400 Level Courses | MATH 400 Level Courses

Course Descriptions (MATH)

MATH 100C-Algebra: Concepts & Skills (3)

Explore mathematics in real-world situations through the development and critique of mathematical models. Within the context of these models, students develop mathematical representations of data, explore relevant questions, and formulate and defend predictions. Students approach the study of algebra through numerical, graphical, and symbolic representations of data. Concepts include: variables, functions, relations, algebraic systems, equivalence, and inequalities.

MATH 104C-P4 Mathematical Perspectives (3)

This course is designed to bring the beauty, fun and utility of mathematics to a broad variety of students. By use of games, puzzles, paradoxes, art, and other explorations, students gain insight into the way mathematicians think and learn ways of thinking that significantly improve their ability to solve problems. Possible topics include number theory and secret codes, notions of the infinite, geometry and topology, chaos and fractals, and probability and expectation.

MATH 109C-College Algebra (4)

Topics include relations and their graphs; functions and some of their important properties; methods for solving such as: equations, inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities; additional topics as time permits.

MATH 111C-SQ Finite Mathematics for the Social Sciences (3)

Topics include: functions, linear and non-linear models, matrix algebra and applications, linear programming applications.

MATH 112C-P4 Calculus for Social Sciences (3)

This course is devoted to the study of calculus concepts and techniques. Emphasis is placed on differential calculus but consideration is also given to integral calculus. Applications to business, industry and the social sciences are heavily stressed in the course. This course is not equivalent to MATH 120C and may not be taken concurrently with MATH 120C or if the equivalent of MATH 120C has been successfully completed.

MATH 114C-P4 Mathematical Explorations I (3)

This course is a mathematics content course. Topics have been selected which illuminate and illustrate mathematics through the development of problem-solving skills. Specific concepts treated are sets, patterns, mathematical operations, number theory concepts, functions, number systems, reasoning about proportions, and uncertainty. The concepts of data and chance are explored in contextual situations. Applications cross over disciplinary boundaries. (Course is cross-listed with MSTI 114C.)

MATH 115C-P4 Mathematical Explorations II (3)

The following concepts are studied within problem-solving contexts: standard functions including linear, polynomial, and exponential; algebraic transformations; modeling; analysis of behavior of functions; geometric transformations, congruence and similarity; two-and three-dimensional objects, representations; process of measurement; and data analysis, statistics, and probability. Cross-listed with MSTE 115C.

Prerequisite: MATH/MSTI 114C.

MATH 119C-P4 Precalculus(4)

The course consists of two parts: a comprehensive study of transcendental functions, and an in-depth study of analytic geometry in two and three dimensions.

Prerequisite: Good command of college algebra concepts and skills.

MATH 120C-P4 Calculus I (4)

This is a first course in calculus for mathematics and science majors. The topics include limits, derivatives, applications of the derivative, tangent lines, concavity, maxima and minima, mean value theorem, definite integral, fundamental theorem of calculus, and applications of the definite integral.

Prerequisite: Good command of pre-calculus concepts and skills.

MATH 122C-P4 Calculus II (4)

This is a second course in calculus, building on the material of MATH 120C. The subject matter includes transcendental functions, techniques of integration, polar coordinates, arc length, indeterminate forms, infinite series, power series, Taylor series, and improper integrals.

Prerequisite: MATH 120C with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 150C-Elementary Discrete Mathematics (3)

This course introduces students to the mathematics that is needed for computer science. In particular, this includes, sets, ordered tuples, logic, rates of growth, finite state machines, functions, composition of functions, relations, matrices as representations of digraphs, Karnaugh maps, binary representation of data in the computers.

MATH 170-P4 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling (3)

This course is designed to introduce students to various applications of mathematics utilizing relatively simple mathematics and basic technology. The course reinforces the cycle of steps in modeling real-world phenomena through the study of topics such as: difference equations, sequences of numbers, recursive relationships, and the Game of Life. Designed to complement the sequence of topics in Calculus I, but does not use any calculus concepts.

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MATH 200C-Discrete Structures (3)

This course has a two-fold purpose: the first is to introduce the student to modern mathematics and its methods of argument and proof; the second is to make practical applications of these ideas in the fields of applied mathematics and computer science. The subject matter includes a selection from: sets, functions, relations, combinations, graphs, trees, strings, number systems, abstract structures, Boolean algebra, and the design of logical circuits. Students begin their exploration and study of proofs in mathematics.

Prerequisite: MATH 120C or 150C with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 221C-Calculus III (4)

This is a course in multivariable calculus. The topics include vectors and 3-dimensional coordinate geometry, lines, planes, inner product, cross product, partial derivatives, chain rule, directional derivatives, tangent planes, multiple integrals, areas, volumes, centroids, line integrals, Green's Theorem, Divergence Theorem, surface integrals, and Stokes' Theorem.

Prerequisite: MATH 122C with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 222-Differential Equations (3)

This is a first course in differential equations. The topics are chosen from the following: first-order equations, integrating factors, simple higher-order equations, applications, linear equations with constant coefficients and applications, systems of equations, series solutions, numerical solutions, Laplace transforms.

Prerequisite: MATH 122C with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 232-Linear Algebra (3)

This is a first course in linear algebra. The content includes linear equations, matrices, vector spaces, determinants, linear transformations, and eigen-values.

Prerequisite: MATH 122C with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 260-Applied Mathematical Statistics (3)

Topics studied include the binomial, poisson, normal, t, F, and chi-square distributions and their uses; tests of hypotheses for both large and small samples; regression and correlation; the analysis of variance; time series; and non-parametric methods. A major software package is used.

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MATH 301-Mathematical Statistics I (3)

The content includes probability models, finite sample spaces, conditional probability and independence, random variables, functions and sums of random variables, characterizations of random variables and moment-generating functions.

Prerequisite: MATH 221C with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 302-Mathematical Statistics II (3) Estimation, maximum likelihood, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation are covered.

Prerequisite: MATH 301 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 310-Number Theory (3)

Using an historical approach, the following topics are covered: Euclid's algorithm, prime numbers, perfect numbers, Diophantine equations, congruences, and applications.

Prerequisite: MATH 200C, and MATH 232 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 325-Abstract Algebra (3)

This is a further study of algebraic structures. The topics include groups, rings, integral domains, and fields.

Prerequisite: MATH 200C and MATH 232 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 333-Applied Mathematics I (3)

The first of a two-semester sequence in applied mathematics for the physical sciences and engineering. The course content is derived from the following list of topics: vector calculus; tensor analysis; functions of a complex variable; solutions of partial differential equations; eigen-value problems; Fourier series; Laplace and Fourier transforms;

calculus of variations; and properties of some special functions. Cross-listed with PHYS 333.

Prerequisite: MATH 222 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 334-Applied Mathematics II (3)

A continuation of MATH 333. Cross-listed with PHYS 334.

Prerequisite: MATH 333 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 391C-Numerical Analysis I (3)

A study of numerical methods for solving the following problems: approximating the zeroes of non-linear equations, approximation of functions by polynomials, numerical solution of systems of equations, and numerical integration. Use of the computer for application to the above problems through student written and/or commercially available programs is examined.

Prerequisites: : Math 221C and 232, and CSCI 161 or equivalent, with grades of “C” or higher.

MATH 392-Numerical Analysis II (3)

In addition to an in-depth reexamination of some of the topics in MATH 391C, this course covers solutions of differential equations and systems of differential equations, matrix eigen-value problems, and other matrix problems.

Prerequisites: MATH 391C.

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MATH 400-Special Topics (3)

This course presents a special topic in mathematics that would not be offered regularly. Possible topics include: linear spaces, complex variables, general topology, and differential geometry. This course may be repeated for different topics.

Restrictions: Junior and Senior MATH majors only.

MATH 417-Foundations of Geometry (3)

This course is a study of projective and Euclidean geometries with a special emphasis on axiom systems and the relationships between Euclidean geometry, projective geometry, and the non-Euclidean geometries.

Prerequisites: MATH 200C and MATH 232 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 421-Principles of Real Analysis I (3)

Topics include: sets, functions and sequences of real numbers; limits and continuity; elementary topology in a metric space; Riemann integration; differentiation and the mean value theorem; and sequences of functions and uniform convergence.

Prerequisite: MATH 221C and MATH 325 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 422-Principles of Real Analysis II (3)

This course is a continuation of the topics included in MATH 421.

Prerequisite: MATH 421 with a grade of "C" or higher.

MATH 470-Advanced Perspectives for Secondary Teachers (3)

This course is designed to help students to connect their undergraduate mathematics experience to the high school mathematics curriculum. Concepts from number theory are integrated into the course. This class involves evaluating and critiquing mathematical arguments from across the mathematics curriculum, giving students an opportunity to analyze various logic flaws and misconceptions, reinforcing the structure of proofs and reasoning. Prerequisites: MATH 421 with a grade of “C” or higher.

MATH 480-Mathematics Capstone (3)

Students write and present a senior thesis, involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, on a topic from an area of mathematics. The topic chosen is approved by the course thesis advisors and the Chair of the department. The student works with the thesis advisors to develop a coherent presentation of his or her chosen topic. The written thesis and its oral presentation must be at a level accessible to an audience of majors who may not have studied the topic presented.
Please read the Math480 capstone policy for further information.

Restrictions: Senior MATH majors only.

MATH 490-Internship (3)

The student accepted into this course spends 10 to 15 hours per week as an intern with an organization in the Rochester area. The student performs tasks assigned by the supervisor in the organization with the goal of participating meaningfully in real-world mathematical applications or research. The student keeps a daily journal and participates in a seminar to be held each semester for prospective students and supervising organizations. To qualify for an internship, a student must be a major in mathematics, possess a grade point average of 3.0 or higher in the major, have at least junior standing, and be enrolled in at least one other upper-level mathematics course. Although every effort will be made to arrange an internship for a qualified student, there is no guarantee that there will be a sufficient number of internships to accommodate qualified students wishing to enroll in the course.

Restrictions: Senior MATH majors only.

MATH 496-Independent Study (1-3)

Well-qualified seniors may initiate and carry out a proposal for independent, advanced work under the supervision of a member of the department. Completion of the Independent Study/Tutorial Authorization form is required. See Policy on Independent Study.

Department of Mathematical & Computing Sciences • St. John Fisher College • 3690 East Avenue • Rochester, NY 14618 • Phone: 585.385.8000